Make Payment

Make Payment

Payment for: Payment reference

Options

Waiting for PayPal...
Validating payment information...
Waiting for PayPal...

Communication

Aston University Programme for Small Business Growth

Aston University Programme for Small Business Growth

Petra Gale, Managing Director of Xceeda Group, has been chosen as one of the members of the first cohort of the Aston Programme for Small Business Growth.
Designed specifically for small business leaders in the West Midlands the programme addresses a comprehensive range of issues faced by growing SMEs and puts business leaders at the heart of a network of growth businesses. The programme also includes pitching workshops that put the businesses in a position to approach external funders. Petra Gale said: We are delighted and honoured to be given the opportunity to join the programme. I am determined to focus on our company’s growth and in a busy environment it is very easy to slip into tactical, operational issues and lose sight of strategic direction. 2015 is a big year for Xceeda Group. We will be launching our first product range and adding to our range of innovative learning solutions.
She added: I welcome the opportunity of becoming part of the like-minded business owner network. The Aston Programme for Small Business Growth is part funded by the European Regional Development Fund and is delivered by leading practitioners and faculty members from Aston Business School. The programme will be delivered over the next 3 months and will give all participants the opportunity to step away from their businesses and focus on their growth strategies and short, medium and long term goals, including the exit strategy. Key benefits of the programme are: – gain the confidence to grow your business – use your financial information more effectively to make strategic decisions – create and enhance valuable business networks – learn from the...
Coaching Makes Sense!

Coaching Makes Sense!

Change is the only constant thing in today’s business environment. Management of change requires skills and competencies beyond the practical and technical skills of management. In order to integrate the changes into the continuous flow of our professional existence we engage in the process of sense-making. Much of this process is subconscious and we do not consciously navigate through our process. Let me break it to you – we are not really the victims of our environment, but of our own sense-making process! To make sense of constantly developing situations, see clarity and make the right decision at the right time is often a difficult task. Many tools exist to make the process of sense making easier for managers and one of these tools is coaching. The challenging one to one environment in coaching provides the coachee with the opportunity to explore the situation and its consequences before they embark on it. During the sense-making process individuals need to filter, categorise and integrate new aspects and with the support of coaching this process happens easier and allows the coach to deal with changes in a more conscious manner and in a safe environment. The coach helps the individual to progress through breaking up of the flow of change to anticipate what will happen in different scenarios. Through coaching the coachee can experiment with unusual or off-the-wall ideas without running the risk of failure. These experimentations aid individual creative development. In addition, the purpose of coaching is not only to challenge assumptions about current realities, but to facilitate the process of expanding the vocabulary and thereby the possible options available....
Mastering Storytelling

Mastering Storytelling

As management and leadership development consultants we use the power of storytelling throughout our programmes and training sessions with great success. One of our goals is not only to encourage our candidates to tell their own stories but to collect stories that help them understand their organisational values and culture. Stories make information easier to remember and understand. They are a powerful means of communication. Storytelling entertains, evokes emotion and triggers visual memories. But how can we tell a good story? What are the characteristics of a good story? Here is an example of a short and impactful story: ‘When Ray Kroc was running McDonald’s from its Oakbrook, Illinois headquarters, he often drove by Chicago area McDonald’s restaurants. Usually he asked his driver to stop so he could check things out. One sunny July afternoon, they were about to pass a McDonald’s; Kroc told the driver, “We need to stop at this one”. As they pulled into a parking space, he noticed that the flowering bushes were littered with shake cups, colourful Happy Meal boxes, messy napkins and other trash. Inside, Kroc asked for the manager. Only the assistant manager was there, so Kroc called the manager and waited for the anxious man to rush in after a speedy drive from his nearby home. “What can I do for you, sir?” the manager asked Kroc. Kroc led him to the parking lot, “Look! We don’t want trash around our sites”. So all three – driver, manager, and Ray Kroc – worked together to pick the trash out of the bushes. You’d better believe there was never again any trash...